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Malt and Chicory Powders

Malt Extract Powder products are made by introducing the liquid malt extract onto a slowly moving band passing through the vacuum. The vacuum allows evaporation to happen at a lower temperature and aids the extract to puff. The resultant honeycomb of material is milled into a coarse powder prior to packing. Malt Extract Powder is sweet, pale yellow to yellow in colour, slightly acidic, highly hygroscopic and free flow in nature. An aqueous solution is not clear and deposits a voluminous flocculent precipitate on standing. Completely soluble in cold water and readily soluble in hot water.

Malt Extract Powder

Malt Extract Powder products are made by introducing the liquid malt extract onto a slowly moving band passing through the vacuum. The vacuum allows evaporation to happen at a lower temperature and aids the extract to puff. The resultant honeycomb of material is milled into a coarse powder prior to packing.

 

Malt Extract Powder is sweet, pale yellow to yellow in colour, slightly acidic, highly hygroscopic and free flow in nature. An aqueous solution is not clear and deposits a voluminous flocculent precipitate on standing. Completely soluble in cold water and readily soluble in hot water.

 

Malt is germinated cereal grain that has been dried in a process known as "malting". The grain is made to germinate by soaking in water and is then halted from germinating further by drying with hot air.

Malting grain develops the enzymes (?-amylase, ?-amylase) required for modifying the grains' starches into various types of sugar, including monosaccharide glucose, disaccharide maltose, trisaccharide maltotriose, and higher sugars called maltodextrines.

It also develops other enzymes, such as proteases, that break down the proteins in the grain into forms that can be used by yeast. The point at which the malting process is stopped affects the starch to enzyme ratio and partly converted starch becomes fermentable sugars.

Malt also contains small amounts of other sugars, such as sucrose and fructose, which are not products of starch modification but which are already in the grain. Further conversion to fermentable sugars is achieved during the mashing process.

Malted grain is used to make beer, whisky, malted milk, malt vinegar, confections such as Maltesers and Whoppers, flavored drinks such as Horlicks, Ovaltine, and Milo, and some baked goods, such as malt loaf, bagels, and rich tea biscuits. Malted grain that has been ground into a coarse meal is known as "sweet meal".

Various cereals are malted, though barley is the most common. A high-protein form of malted barley is often a label-listed ingredient in blended flours typically used in the manufacture of yeast breads and other baked goods.

Malted grain for beer production. 


The term "malt" refers to several products of the process: the grains to which this process has been applied, for example malted barley; the sugar, heavy in maltose, derived from such grains, such as the baker's malt used in various cereals; or a product based on malted milk, similar to a malted milkshake (i.e., "malts").


Dried extracts offer many benefits and have the following characteristics:

·         Non-diastatic

·         Coarse powder

·         Easily soluble

·         Additional flavour derived from 'cooking' process

·         Inclusion of other ingredients like milk powder, fat, sugar, where ever possible



 

Product Properties

General Appearance Powder Brown Powder, Free
from foreign matter
Odour/Flavour Pleasant and
characteristically malty
Taste Sweet with malt flavor,
free from foreign flavor
Solubility Readily Dissolves in
Warm Water. 


Applications

Malt Powder products are made using liquid dark malt extract and have the following applications:

1. Nutritious food

2. Milk based health care drinks 

3. Pharmaceuticals

4.  Biscuits

5.  Beverages

6. Confectionery

7. Bakery products

8. Home Brewing 

9. Cereals & Malt Extract Powder

Available pack sizes

25kg

Barley Malt

The Company has a dedicated team of qualified grain buyers having decades of experience in purchasing thousands of tonnes of quality barley. Each of our malting sites has its own requirements; however, they all specify that barley for malting must achieve at least 95% germination.

Generally, barley is classified into six-row and two-row barley. The six-row barley has higher enzyme content, more protein, less starch, and a thicker husk than two-row barley. The higher level of diastatic enzymes makes six-row barley desirable for conversion of adjunct starches (those that lack enzymes) during mashing. The two-row barley has lower protein content which reduces the problems with haze in the finished beer.

On the down side, the higher protein content can result in greater break material (hot and cold), as well as possibly increased problems with haze in the finished beer.

Malted Barley, Barley Malt or Malt is best understood as a healthy cereal alternative to any normal source of starch for making bakery or confectionary. But that’s not just it; As Malt is best associated with Beer and Single Malts or Malt Blended Whiskies. The most basic ingredient that would be able to elevate the health aspect of any processed food without compromising on the flavour rather complimenting it called Malt.

Malted Barley, Barley Malt or Malt in simplest terms is germinated to the perfect stage where the natural enzymes present in the grain breaks down the starch from a complex stage to a very simplified form in order to enhance the food values and also increase the digestibility.

 

Product Properties

General Appearance Powder Yellow Powder, Free from foreign matter
Odour/Flavour Free from off flavours & Odours
Taste Characteristic taste of Barley 
Solubility Readily Dissolves in Warm Water.

Applications

Health Supplements, Icecreams, Nutraceutical Products, Non-Alcoholic Beverages, Biscuits, Confectionery, Bread & Bakery, Malted Milk Foods.

Available pack sizes

25kg

High Protein Malt Powder

Protein content and kernel plumpness affect the speed at which barley goes through the malting process.

To understand protein content, first we need to know what it is and what it does.  The proteins formed in barley start in the field, and are affected primarily by fertilizer and weather conditions.  Hot, dry growing seasons will created elevated levels of protein in barley, while cool and damp growing seasons will created more moderate levels.  Fertilizer is important because under-fertilized fields will yield lower proteins, which at their basic level are carbohydrates with added nitrogen atoms.  Nitrogen in fertilizer is what gives a plant energy to grow, so it makes sense that it will have an affect on the overall protein levels in the harvest.

Higher protein levels can even temp non-saccharomyces microorganisms as a food source, as they can access the nutrients that protein provides, making your beer more likely to sour or spoil.  High proteins will even have an effect on color and extract potential, making your finished beer darker and lighter in gravity than you planned. 

Protein levels are a big key in brewing consistency.  As a rule of thumb, ensure that your base malts have protein levels between 9.5% and 12.5%.  Below 9.5%, you will experience poor efficiency in the mash tun because you won’t have enough enzyme to convert your carbohydrates  Think of doing a Munich malt S.M.A.S.H; it has just enough enzyme to barely convert itself, but efficiency sucks. If it’s above 12.5%, it will limit the carbohydrates that you actually have access to, meaning poor efficiency, because the grain has trouble taking up water and the enzyme can’t get to the starch.  On top of that, you work towards creating a very hazy beer unless you use extra enzyme like Clarity Ferm.

 

Most of the extract and all fermentable sugars are derived from starch. Starch synthesis occurs during grain fill, but when environmental stresses reduce this process, less starch and proportionally more protein are formed in the kernel. The grain then tends to be thinner and has a higher proportion of husk to endosperm.

“Aside from the extract, there are a number of other problems associated with the malting and brewing of high-protein barley,” Schwarz says. “High protein can lead to haze problems in the beer and it is more difficult for maltsters to control the color of the malt during processing. Beer color is derived from the malt. Most popular American beers are very light in color. Higher protein barley tends to yield dark malts.”

Protein content and kernel plumpness affect the speed at which barley goes through the malting process. In malting, the grain first is soaked in water (“steeping”) to approximately 45 percent moisture. It then is allowed to germinate for four to five days until the proper modification or changes in the grain structure and composition are achieved. The germinated barley then is dried, (“kilning”) to approximately 5 percent moisture. The entire process takes six to eight days, depending upon the sample.

Thin grain will absorb water and modify at a faster rate than plump grain. In samples with a wide distribution in kernel plumpness, maltsters first may grade the barley into a number of size fractions and malt them separately. Grading is required more frequently with six-rowed barley than with two-rowed, but can be used to achieve better uniformity in the final malt. Protein also affects the rate of water uptake and speed of modification. For this reason, maltsters will segregate shipments by protein content and malt them separately.

One other issue that tends to arise when discussing protein in malting barley is whether to blend high- and low-protein barley lots to meet protein specifications. The result of this would be a nonuniform rate of modification during malting. This leads to serious problems for brewers.

Essentially, some of the grain in such a sample may be modified properly, while another portion is over or undermodified. Dealing with nonuniform malt actually is a larger problem than dealing with a uniform high-protein sample.

The result concerning protein in malting barley is that maltsters and brewers generally are reluctant to use six-rowed barley with more than 13.5 percent protein and two-rowed with more than 13 percent.

“However, these limits vary between specific companies and depend upon their brewing processes and the products produced,” Schwarz says. “Some protein is needed in brewing for things such as for good beer foam and proper yeast growth during fermentation. Therefore, there also are minimal limits on protein, but low protein is rarely a problem, especially under dryland barley production.”

 

Product Properties

General Appearance Powder Yellow Powder, Free from foreign matter
Odour/Flavour Free from off flavours & Odours
Taste Characteristic 
Solubility Readily Dissolves in Warm Water.

Applications

Health Supplements, Ice creams, Nutraceutical Products, Non-Alcoholic Beverages, Biscuits, Confectionery, Bread & Bakery, Malted Milk Foods.

Available pack sizes

25kg

Chicory Extract Powder

Despite being around for over two centuries, chicory coffee has gained popularity in recent years. This hot beverage tastes like coffee but is made of roasted chicory root instead of coffee beans. It is popular among those trying to reduce their caffeine intake and may be linked to several health benefits, including reduced inflammation, decreased blood sugar and improved digestive health.

Roasted Chicory Extract Powder is available with the similar taste like coffee. Its granules are widely used as substitute of coffee when you do not need caffeine. Roasted Chicory is present in the extract of inulin, which is a polysaccharide like to starch accessible in roots. Asteraceae family is mostly used for the removal processes in form of carbohydrate. In addition, sucrose, cellulose, protein, ash and other components are also used as ingredient. The extraction process is done by drying the root of chicory under sun or hot air oven. The grinded root is mixed with accurate amount of water. In this procedure, the insoluble materials are separated through filtration as well as centrifugal action. There is also one another method for separating sugar extract as well as pigments. Roasted Chicory Extract is used for stiff joints, rheumatism, upset stomach, gout, blood purifying, etc. It is also used as laxative and diuretic.

Being a leading manufacturer of wide range of organic food.
Chicory Extract has the same taste like coffee but should not be term as synonym of coffee. The granules of this are used as substitute of coffee when there is no requirement of caffeine. In 1930s during the situation of coffee crisis, this extract was used as an ingredient for adding the flavor to stouts.

 

Chemical composition:

The main component present in extract is inulin that is a polysaccharide similar to starch available in roots. Asteraceae family is mainly used for the extraction process in form of carbohydrate. The other chemical components used are:

  • 14% sucrose
  • 5% cellulose
  • 6% protein
  • 4% ash
  • 3% other components

Processing:

Extraction process: The root of chicory is dried under sun or using hot air oven. The grinded root is then mixed with water. In this process the insoluble materials get separated through filtration and centrifugal action. Other method is also used for separating sugar extract and pigments.

Test parameters:

Final brix

65 to 70° brix

pH

4.5 to 4.8

Color

Brown

DS

22-23% in 1:3 ratio, 25-26% in 1:4 ratio

RS

25-26



Uses:

  • Stiff joints
  • Rheumatism
  • Upset stomach
  • Gout
  • Blood purifying
  • laxative
  • Diuretic
 

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